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America Dog Tick

America Dog Tick

Dermacentor variabilis, also known as the American dog tick or Wood tick, is a species of tick that is known to carry bacteria responsible for several diseases in humans, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia (Francisella tularensis). It is one of the most well-known hard ticks. Diseases are spread when it sucks blood from the host, which could take several days for the host to experience some symptoms.

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American Roach

American Roach

The American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), also colloquially known as the waterbug, but not a true waterbug since it is not aquatic, or misidentified as the palmetto bug (see Florida woods cockroach for the differences), is the largest species of common cockroach, and often considered a pest. It is also known as the ship cockroach, kakerlac, and Bombay canary.

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Argentine Ant

Argentine Ant

The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile, is a dark ant native to northern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil.

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Arizona Bark Scorpion

Arizona Bark Scorpion

The Arizona bark scorpion, is a small light brown scorpion common to the Sonoran Desert in southwest United States and northern Mexico. An adult male can reach 8 cm in length, while a female is slightly smaller, with a maximum length of 7 cm.

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Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs

Bed bugs are parasitic insects of the cimicid family that feed exclusively on blood. Cimex lectularius, the common bed bug, is the best known as it prefers to feed on human blood although other Cimex species are specialized to other animals, e.g., bat bugs, Cimex pipistrelli (Europe), Cimex pilosellus (western US), and Cimex adjunctus (entire eastern US).

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Black Carpet Beetle

Black Carpet Beetle

The black carpet beetle, Attagenus unicolor, is a beetle, 3–5 millimetres long, that can be a serious household pest. The larvae grow to 7 mm in length, are reddish brown in colour and covered with bristles.

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Black Widow

Black Widow

Black widow spider is one of several spiders in the genus Latrodectus. The name of the group refers to the tendency of the females of some species to devour the male after copulation.

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Brown House Cricket

Brown House Cricket

Acheta domesticus, commonly called the house cricket, is a cricket most likely native to Southwestern Asia, but has spread worldwide. They are commercially bred as food for pets such as amphibians, arthropods, birds, and reptiles, but can be kept as pets themselves, as has been the case in China and Japan.

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Brown Recluse

Brown Recluse

The brown recluse spider or violin spider, Loxosceles reclusa, Sicariidae is a spider with a venomous bite. Brown recluse spiders are usually between 6–20 mm, but may grow larger.

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Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Wildtype fruit flies are yellow-brown, with brick red eyes and transverse black rings across the abdomen. They exhibit sexual dimorphism: females are about 2.5 millimeters (0.098 in) long; males are slightly smaller with darker backs. Males are easily distinguished from females based on colour differences, with a distinct black patch at the abdomen, less noticeable in recently emerged flies (see fig.), and the sexcombs (a row of dark bristles on the tarsus of the first leg). Furthermore, males have a cluster of spiky hairs (claspers) surrounding the reproducing parts used to attach to the female during mating. There are extensive images at FlyBase.

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Honey Bee

Honey Bee

Honey bees (or honeybees) are a subset of bees in the genus Apis, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests from wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, only seven species of honey bee are recognized, with a total of 44 subspecies,[1] though historically, from six to 11 species have been recognised. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the roughly 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees.

Hornet

Hornets are the largest eusocial wasps; some species can reach up to 5.5 cm (2.2 in) in length. The true hornets make up the genus Vespa and are distinguished from other vespines by the width of the vertex (part of the head behind the eyes), which is proportionally larger in Vespa and by the anteriorly rounded gasters (the section of the abdomen behind the wasp waist). The best known species is the European hornet (Vespa crabro), about 2–3.5 cm in length, widely distributed throughout Europe, Russia, North America and Northeast Asia.